Paris – a city renowned for café culture, fashion, romance and art. The city is one of architectural and aesthetic splendour. Sheridan&Co embarked upon a la flânerie in the city, which is French for a free-spirited stroll soaking up the energy and beauty of Paris.

From strolls in within the historic district of Le Marais, to the key retail are of The Triangle d’Or (Golden Triangle), our wanders led us on a path of discovering inspiration and innovation on cobbled Parisian streets. Here are three new openings that caught our attention.

Citadium 65 Av. des Champs-Élysées, 75008 Paris, France

Launched in July, the clothing and footwear store is a resounding hit with generation Z and millennials. Politically engaged and proactive, activist inspired merchandising courts consumers who are on a mission to champion their voice and change the world. With store copy including ‘fuck the rules’ and ‘power to the youth’, language is direct, bold and focuses on honing in messages rooted in empowerment.

Playful neon lighting elsewhere in the store keeps the communication light hearted and fun. The store is divided into three floors. The first consists of women and men’s fashion. The ground floor is entitled ‘Streetwear and Funkytown’. Trading on speed, Funkytown consists of impulse buys and gifting options that are shrewdly positioned at the front of the store. ‘Sneakers World’ occupies the basement with hip-hop references and streetwear taking the centre stage. Here consumers are invited to stay longer and hang out in a chill area.

To nurture theatrical moments and court experience driven millennials, participatory activations feature on each of the three floors of the store. As the consumer enters, there is an opportunity to discover in-store T-shirt printing. The brand shrewdly has a large array of ‘ready selected’ designs. These include a kinder bueno inspired ‘tinder surprise’ to ‘Drake and champagne,’ and ‘Jesus is Gucci’.

Designs borrow from the world of popular culture that encompasses memes and concepts whereby nostalgic references marry modern day phenomenon. This breeds narratives that nurture relevancy with the consumer. The printing takes all but four minutes and there is an opportunity for the more creative consumers to bring their own designs to store. Additionally, a photo booth is located on the ground floor for the instagram attuned.

In the basement, consumers are invited to scratch a card for code to unlock a pair of Adidas sneakers concealed in a glass box. On the first floor, a jeweller’s atelier enables consumers to have items monogramed and personalised.

Grand Café Tortoni, 45 Rue de Saintonge, 75003 Paris, France

Launched at the start of summer, this large beauty emporium is part café, part traditional perfumery with an in-house Japanese floristry specialising in dried arrangements. The décor is inspired a 19th century design. Consumers enter and are immediately greeted by a bar of fragrant powders, perfumes, soaps and potions. Old-style props and scales are perfectly positioned next to products.

Directly opposite, there is a café that is inspired by the eminent Belle Époque coffeehouse located on the Boulevard des Italiens. In reference to Marcel Proust’s theory of memory, madeleines are available to be enjoyed by guests in quaint glass cake stands. Accompanying this delicacy, homemade ice cream, hot chocolates and traditional tea are also on offer in vintage teacups and saucers.

Discerningly, the store’s occupies the former location of the foundry responsible for casting Auguste Rodin’s “The Thinker” sculpture. Courting the new elite, a bourgeoning consumer group that prioritises the acquisition of knowledge, the store has no advertising budget and relies on the eagle-eyed consumer who delights in being ‘in the know’. This tactic breeds ‘insider status’, fostering exclusivity and elevating self-importance.

The Maison du Danemark, 142 Av. des Champs-Élysées, 75008 Paris, France

Characterised by minimalism, driven by function, Scandinavian design seduces with simplicity. Launched earlier this year on the Champs-Élysées, the Maison du Danemark offers two restaurants; Flora Danica, a high-end brasserie and Copenhague, a fine-dining concept.

The colour scheme and furniture choice combines a Parisian aesthetic with a Danish design direction to create an alluring space. Both restaurants incorporate classic mid-century Danish pieces with contemporary items. However, each restaurant has its own personality and visual identity. Additionally, botanical sketches and plants nurture a green space that invites customers to relax on these exciting Parisian streets.